health worker

Against the Odds: Helping Mothers and Babies Survive (CPI Partners, Nov. 2011)

A report on the Mobile Obstetrics Maternal Health Worker (MOM) Project by CPI  partner organizations the Burma Medical Association and the Mae Tao Clinic

In eastern Myanmar half a million internally displaced persons live in the cross-fire of the world's longest on-going civil conflict, and women face grave risks giving birth. Surveys conducted by CPI 's local partners showed that the vast majority of women gave birth at home without a trained attendant, and fewer that five percent had access to emergency obstetric care.

KDHW: Making Pregnancy and Childbirth Safer in Burma / Myanmar's Conflict Zones

MAE SOT, 17 October 2011 (IRIN) - In conflict-afflicted eastern Myanmar, until recently obstetric care was often crude, unsterile and dangerous for both mother and child, health experts say.

When labour pains began, traditional birth attendants routinely pushed the woman's stomach, sometimes injuring or killing the baby; others used sharp slivers of bamboo, which had been cleaned with charcoal, to cut the umbilical cord, leading to deadly infections.

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