village

KDHW: Making Pregnancy and Childbirth Safer in Burma / Myanmar's Conflict Zones

MAE SOT, 17 October 2011 (IRIN) - In conflict-afflicted eastern Myanmar, until recently obstetric care was often crude, unsterile and dangerous for both mother and child, health experts say.

When labour pains began, traditional birth attendants routinely pushed the woman's stomach, sometimes injuring or killing the baby; others used sharp slivers of bamboo, which had been cleaned with charcoal, to cut the umbilical cord, leading to deadly infections.

CROSS-CUTTING INITIATIVES

Real life sprawls across categories. Tackling diarrheal diseases, for example, takes medicine, hygiene training, and toilets. A single project in isolation, even if it’s a good one, can’t by itself move a whole community forward. That’s why we work with our local partners to integrate health, education and community development.

It Takes a Village Health Worker: The key to healthy communities in eastern Burma / Myanmar

In a Karen village of chickens and woven-thatch homes is “Aunty,” a traditional woman with her hair in a bun. She teaches about hand washing, latrines and nutrition, and tests for and treats malaria. Aunty is chosen by the community, and she’s there to help 24/7.

Health Systems Strengthening

In eastern Myanmar, one in seven children die before they reach the age of five, and many of these deaths — due to diarrhea, pneumonia and malaria — are easily preventable. The challenge is to provide essential basic services to tens of thousands of villagers who have become nearly inaccessible due to civil conflict, displacement, and isolated and rugged terrain.

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$40 treats one severely malnourished child in a therapeutic feeding program. In villages in eastern Myanmar, one-third of all children are malnourished.

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